Header

Sunday, May 22, 2016

Survival Japanese as a Traveling Vegetarian

In you stay at a temple in the Mount Koya area, you may be able to enjoy a vegetarian food named
  • 精進料理  /  しょじん りょり  /  Shojin ryori 
    • This is a buddhist temple food
But, normally Shojin ryori is not served outside the temple.


Survival Guides


If you are a vegetarian traveling in Japan, you may want to read the following general guides first:
In this article, we try to offer more suggestions and helps for a vegetarian traveling in Japan.

Most Common Japanese Vegetarian Foods


If you are a vegetarian, you may want to consider the following common vegetarian dishes in Japan:[1]
  1. Mochi /  / もち / mochi
  2. Eggplant /  なす / nasu (and other vegetable side dishes)
  3. Skewer  /  串物  / くしもの / kushi-mono
  4. Pickles  /  漬物 / つけもの / tsukemono
  5. Daikon / 大根 / だいこん / daikon
  6. Beans /  / まめ / mame
  7. Nori seaweed (and kelp) / 海苔 / のり / nori
  8. Tofu / 豆腐 / とうふ / tofu
  9. Burdock root (and sometimes carrot) 
  10. / 金平/ きんぴら / kinpira
  11. Rice / 米 /  コメ / kome
If you stay in Kyoto area, you will find more vegetarian choices like:
  • Tofu skin / 湯葉 / ゆば / yuba 
  • Wheat Starch  / なマーフ  / nama-fu 
  • Kyoto-style vegetables / 京野菜 / きょ やさい / kyo yasai 
  • Dark seaweed / 鹿尾菜  / ひじき / hijiki
  • Dried daikon strips / きりぼし大根 /  kiriboshi daikon 

Dashi Broth


Dashi (だし)is a Japanese stock or broth, and it is a fundamental ingredient in many Japanese dishes including vegetarian dishes. Dashi is made from kombu (dried kelp), bonito flakes (dried and smoked skipjack tuna that is shaved into thin flakes), anchovies/sardine (iriko or niboshi), or a combination of all or two of them.

In case you are a vegan, maybe you want to pay more attention to what ingredients are used in the Dashi (だし) broth.

Useful Japanese Phrases


As a vegetarian, you can watch Yuka's video here to learn some useful phrases while you travel in Japan:

I am a vegetarian

わたし
 私 は ベジタリアン です
Watashi wa bejitarian desu


I don't eat meat 

わた     にく    
 私  は お肉 を 食べません
Watashi wa Oniku wo tabemasen


I don't eat seafood 

わたし      さかな     た
  私 は お 魚 を 食べません
Watashi wa Osakana wo tabemasen


I don't eat egg 

わたし       たまご      
私 は お 玉子 を 食べません
Watashi waō tamago o shoku bemasen

Is bonito used in the dashi broth?
             ぶし    つか
おだし に  かつお節 わ 使って いますか
Odashi ni Katsuobushi wa tsukatte imasuka?


I'm a vegan 

わたし   かん ぜん さい しょく しゅぎしゃ

 私 は 完  全  菜  食 主義者   です
Watashi wa kan zen saishoku shugisha desu

Photo Credit

References

  1. 10 vegetarian foods you can order at almost any Japanese restaurant
  2. 食べログ (Tabelog
    • Restaurant search in Japan
  3. Meaning of Japanese
    • Pronunciation sounds good
  4. Japan Guide: 4 Useful JAPANESE Phrases for Vegetarians :JAPAN 101 (video)
  5. Japan Travel Guide: 5 Things You Should Know about Restaurants in Japan (video)
  6. Japan Guide : 5 Things You should Know about Restaurants in Japan #2 : Japan Travel Guide (video)
    • Need to know about what otoshi (or cover charge) is at izakaya (居酒屋).  
      • Normally, you cannot avoid paying for otoshi.
  7. Eating vegan in Japan – survival guide
  8. Some vegan restaurants in Kyoto (2008)
  9. Groceries in Japan – A Short Guide
  10. Survival Japanese at Restaurants (Travel for a Purpose)
  11. Romanization of Japanese
  12. yōshoku (洋食)—Western-style Japanese Foods
  13. Survival Japanese at Restaurants (Travel for a Purpose)
  14. 111 Japanese Phrases for Beginners (video).
  15. HOW TO SAY HELLO IN JAPANESE (video)
  16. Japanese: Top 25 Adjectives to Learn (Travel for a Purpose)
  17. Japanese: Top 15 Questions to Learn (Travel for a Purpose)

1 comment:

  1. How to Make Pemmican The Ultimate Survival Food

    People really should avert their gaze from the modern survival thinking for just a bit and also look at how folks 150 years ago did it. These guys were the last generation to practice basic things-for a living-that we call survival skills now.

    Click on the link bellow to find out how the early pioneers - who had a long hard journey ahead - built the Self-Feeding Fire in order to take a much needed refreshing nap (no need to add logs).

    How to Start a Self-Feeding Fire That Lasts All Night Long

    People really should avert their gaze from the modern survival thinking for just a bit and also look at

    How folks 150 years ago did it.

    These guys were the last generation to practice basic things-for a living-that we call survival skills now.

    Survival Things Our Great Grandfathers Did Or Built Around The House.

    Remember... back in those days, there was no electricity... no refrigerators... no law enforcement... and certainly no grocery store or supermarkets...

    So I really can't think of anyone more qualified in sharing real-life survival lessons than people who lived through times like these.

    Survival Things Our Great Grandfathers Did Or Built Around The House.

    ReplyDelete